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Education from an Anabaptist/Christian Perspective:

A Day of Keynote Addresses, Workshops and Discussions

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Saturday, March 4, 2017

8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Registration for the entire day is $39, lunch included.


Keynote Addresses will take place in the Fine Arts Center. Moderator: Fred Kniss, Provost of Eastern Mennonite University

 

SCHEDULE

8:00 a.m.— Registration (for those who have not pre-registered) — Fine Arts Center lobby

8:30 a.m. Keynote #1—“What do Anabaptist principles contribute to what happens in the classroom?” — John D. Roth, Goshen College professor, author, editor

9:10 a.m. Workshop Period One (9:10-10:05 a.m.)

10:15 a.m. Keynote #2— “Ten observations about our 75-year history” — J. Richard Thomas, former LM Superintendent

10:50 a.m. Workshop Period Two (10:50 – 11:50 a.m.)

Noon– 1:20 p.m.—Lunch (provided) — Alumni Dining Hall 1:30 p.m.

Keynote #3— “In the end, what is ‘Christian’ about education?” —Susan Schultz Huxman, president of Eastern Mennonite University

2:15 p.m. Workshop Period Three (2:15-3:15 p.m.)

3:25 p.m. Workshop Period Four (3:25-4:25 p.m.)

4:30 p.m. End of Conference

 

WORKSHOPS

9:10 a.m. Workshop Period One (9:10-10:05 a.m.)

W#1 “How to give students a global vision and experience (with examples from Mennonite World Conference).” Led by John D. Roth.

W#2 “Similarities and differences between Mennonite schools in the U.S. and those in Canada through the years.” Also, a case study of the very different origins of Rockway Mennonite High School and Conrad Grebel College, and the implications for Mennonite education. Led by Susan Schultz Huxman.

W#3 “Stories Dick Thomas could tell (and will!) from through the years, thoughtful to funny.” Led by J. Richard Thomas. W#4 “Innovation, business, and community.” Many LMS grads have become entrepreneurs. Is this mainly because of the tight-knit Mennonite and Amish communities out of which many have come? Or was there something in the LMS environment (at least during certain eras of the school) that encouraged inventiveness and thinking outside the box? Or were certain grads inventive and innovators in spite of (rather than because of) their experiences at LMS? Do the pressures of conformity within a community that tries to practice nonconformity to the world actually stifle creativity? Observations and examples. Led by Jim Smucker.

W#5 “What about the environment of this campus?” How has the stewardship of the natural resources and the landscape of the campus changed and developed through the years? Led by John M. Thomas, Charles Longenecker and Herb Kraybill.

W#6 “Students and spiritual development from K through 12.” Exploring the best practices for teaching faith formation. Led by Jenn Esbenshade and Jon Heinly

W#7 “Project-based learning: Its impact on our learning community and its seamless fit as an educational model within our Anabaptist framework.” Led by Elizabeth Landis and the Lancaster Mennonite Middle School team.

W#8 “Is it possible to teach humility and academic excellence at the same time, with an honest heart?” Led by Phyllis Pellman Good.

W#9 “How do Mennonite schools relate to sponsoring churches if they are fragmented? Or has it always been so?” Thoughts and observations. Led by Diane Zimmerman Umble.

W#10 “Managing school athletics.” Is it possible to keep athletics from controlling the school? Was it a mistake to introduce organized sports at LMS? Was it a mistake to not include football? Led by David A. King.

W#11 “How have the arts at LMS evolved through the years?” Join a conversation about music, art, drama, etc. Led by Mary Lou Weaver Houser and Marcy Hostetler.

W#12 “The urge or conviction to be counter-cultural. How has that changed through the years?” Do students leave LMS with this as part of their DNA, or do they soon forget it? Observations and examples. Led by Donald B. Kraybill.

W#13 “What are the pros and cons of attending public schools compared to Mennonite schools?” Observations by an LMS alum who served as a long-time teacher and administrator in public schools. Led by Robert Wyble.

W#14 “What LMS students learn about following Jesus in an age of contrasts in wealth and inequality.” Led by Beth Weaver-Kreider and several students.

W#23 “C.S.I.: Menno-Style.” Participants will delve into an active learning “crime scene investigation” that highlights a topic from the underside of history. This workshop grows out of and connects with the Mennonite Schools Council “Faith Practice Statement 5” – “The school enables students to practice global awareness, cultural sensitivity, anti-racism, and compassionate living.” Led by Sheri Wenger.

 

10:50 a.m. Workshop Period Two (10:50 – 11:50 a.m.)

W#15 “The loneliness of teaching—how to keep things fresh and not burn out.” Led by John D. Roth.

W#16 “Challenges and dilemmas of ‘marketing’ Mennonite education in today’s world.” Led by Susan Schultz Huxman.

W#17 “From ‘de-merits’ to ‘zero tolerance’ to ‘restorative discipline’—a survey of the changing approaches to discipline at LMS through the years.” Led by J. Richard Thomas with two respondents.

W#18 “Teach me your way, O Lord—75 years with the same theme.” How has our view of the Bible changed? From “Bible Doc” to “Jesus Story.” Led by J. W. Sprunger.

W#19 “Frontiers on child safety through the decades at LMS.” Led by Miles Yoder and Ann Martin.

W#20 “A Native American view of the land where our campus now sits before Yeates or LMS arrived.” Led by Rusty Sherrick, of Lenape and Mennonite Brethren background, and Darvin Martin, expert on local Native Americans.

W#21 “Does athletic participation build character?” If so, how? Or is this a myth? Are LMS athletes different in any way from athletes from public schools? Should they be? Led by Fred Winey and three former students.

W#22 “Why have so many LMS grads become leaders in social agency nonprofits and other nonprofits?” Observations and examples. Led by Kevin King and respondents.

W#23-R “C.S.I.: Menno-Style.” Participants will delve into an active learning “crime scene investigation” that highlights a topic from the underside of history. This workshop grows out of and connects with the Mennonite Schools Council “Faith Practice Statement 5” – “The school enables students to practice global awareness, cultural sensitivity, anti-racism, and compassionate living.” Led by Sheri Wenger.

W#24 “A history of food at LMS.” How have menus varied through the years? Lunch ladies talk! When were dietitians and nutritionists first introduced? From family-style to standard cafeteria to“jumble” style. How have government standards affected meals through the years? How has eating together affected long-term relationships? Led by Phyllis Pellman Good and respondents.

W#25 “From ‘Mennonite’ to ‘Missional’—a look at the change of emphases and its effect on Mennonite education.” Led by Carlos Romero and Elaine Moyer. W#26-R “Observations and anecdotes about how students and faculty felt God moving in their lives at LMS, with examples from several time periods.” Led by Ernest Hess.

W#27 “Affluence and ‘Edfluence’—Do grads of Mennonite schools live more contented lives?” Should that be the goal? Are there ways for our schools to influence students to focus on “enough” instead of “more”? Or is that no longer important? Led by Merle Good.

W#28 “A non-emotional look at the history of changes at LMS.” Plain dress, ways to socialize, athletic competition, Mennonite students becoming the minority, dances on campus, etc. Led by Ruth Lesher (’71), Elvin Kennel (’79), and Lena Brown (’52).

W#11-R “How have the arts at LMS evolved through the years?” Join a conversation about music, art, drama, etc. Led by Mary Lou Weaver Houser and Marcy Hostetler.

 

2:15 p.m. Workshop Period Three (2:15-3:15 p.m.)

W#1-R “How to give students a global vision and experience (with examples from Mennonite World Conference).” Led by John D. Roth.

W#2-R “Similarities and differences between Mennonite schools in the U.S. and those in Canada through the years.” Also, a case study of the very different origins of Rockway Mennonite High School and Conrad Grebel College, and the implications for Mennonite education. Led by Susan Schultz Huxman.

W#29 “The puzzle of finances and ownership — the changing relationships between the supporting churches and the school.” Led by J. Richard Thomas with Diane Zimmerman Umble.

W#36 “Advantages and challenges of diversity in a student body.” Examples, observations, and trends. Led by Carlos Romero and Elaine Moyer.

W# 31 “The value of a liberal arts education for a conscientious mind and soul in the 21st century.” In a complex and bewildering world, a liberal arts education from K-16 (kindergarten through college) can be the best preparation for living a meaningful life. It offers approaches for instilling critical thinking, collaborative problem solving, compassion, and creativity. Led by Ryan Sauder.

W#32 “A look at the tensions between creativity and community.” Concrete examples from LMS’ 75-year history. Led by Fred Kniss.

W#26-R “Observations and anecdotes about how students and faculty felt God moving in their lives at LMS, with examples from several time periods.” Led by Ernest Hess.

W#33 “How have international students changed or enhanced the flavor and fiber of LMS?” Student life, effects on faculty and staff, influences on church and community? Led by Kirk Benner and Christy Horst, with Chung Hee ( Jane) Kim.

W#20-R “A Native American view of the land where our campus now sits before Yeates or LMS arrived.” Led by Rusty Sherrick, of Lenape and Mennonite Brethren background, and Darvin Martin, expert on local Native Americans.

W#12-R “The urge or conviction to be counter-cultural. How has that changed through the years?” Do students leave LMS with this as part of their DNA, or do they soon forget it? Observations and examples. Led by Donald B. Kraybill.

W#5-R “What about the environment of this campus?” How has the stewardship of the natural resources and the landscape of the campus changed and developed through the years? Led by John M. Thomas, Charles Longenecker, and Herb Kraybill.

W# 14-R “What LMS students learn about following Jesus in an age of contrasts in wealth and inequality.” Led by Beth Weaver-Kreider and several students.

W#6-R “Students and spiritual development—from K through 12.” Exploring the best practices for teaching faith formation. Led by Jenn Esbenshade and Jon Heinly.

W#13-R “What are the pros and cons of attending public school compared to Mennonite schools?” Observations by an LMS alum who served as a long-time teacher and administrator in public schools. Led by Robert Wyble. W#19-R “Frontiers on child safety through the decades at LMS.” Led by Miles Yoder and Ann Martin.

W#8-R “Is it possible to teach humility and academic excellence at the same time, with an honest heart?” Led by Phyllis Pellman Good.

W#21-R “Does athletic participation build character?” If so, how? Or is this a myth? Are LMS athletes different in any way from athletes from public schools? Should they be? Led by Fred Winey and three former students.

3:25 p.m. Workshop Period Four (3:25-4:25 p.m.)

W#15-R “The loneliness of teaching— how to keep things fresh and not burn out.” Led by John D. Roth. W#16-R “Challenges and dilemmas of ‘marketing’ Mennonite education in today’s world.” Led by Susan Schultz Huxman.

W#17-R “From ‘de-merits’ to ‘zero tolerance’ to ‘restorative discipline’—a survey of the changing approaches to discipline at LMS through the years.” Led by J. Richard Thomas with two respondents.

W#35 “Observations and discussion of Perry Bush’s new book, Peace, Progress, and the Professor.” What does it mean to be Mennonite in the modern world? And what is the witness of a peace church that is always at risk of splintering? C.Henry Smith—son of an Amish family, erudite historian, urbane bank president, and pioneer of Mennonite scholarship—sought answers to these questions in the middle of the 20th century, and his answers reverberate through the church to this day. Historian Perry Bush chronicles Smith’s childhood in an Illinois farming community, his youthful turn toward intellectual inquiry, and his confidence that Anabaptist faith and life offer gifts to the wider world. Led by Preston Bush.

W#10-R “Managing school athletics.” Is it possible to keep athletics from controlling the school? Was it a mistake to introduce organized sports at LMS? Was it a mistake to not include football? Led by David A. King. W#25-R “From ‘Mennonite’ to ‘Missional’—a look at the change in emphases and its effect on Mennonite education.” Led by Carlos Romero and Elaine Moyer.

W#27-R “Affluence and ‘Edfluence’—Do grads of Mennonite schools live more contented lives?” Should that be the goal? Are there ways for our schools to influence students to focus on “enough” instead of “more”? Or is that no longer important? Led by Merle Good.

W#7-R “Project-based learning: Its impact on our learning community and its seamless fit as an educational model within our Anabaptist framework.” Led by Elizabeth Landis and the Lancaster Mennonite Middle School team.

W#18-R “Teach me your way, O Lord— 75 years with the same theme.” How has our view of the Bible changed? From “Bible Doc” to “Jesus Story.” Led by J. W. Sprunger.

W#28-R “A non-emotional look at the history of changes at LMS.” Plain dress, ways to socialize, athletic competition, Mennonite students becoming the minority, dances on campus, etc. Led by Ruth Lesher (’71), Elvin Kennel (’79), and Lena Brown (’52).

W#24-R “A history of food at LMS.” How have menus varied through the years? Lunch ladies talk! When were dietitians and nutritionists first introduced? From family-style to standard cafeteria to “jumble” style. How have government standards affected meals through the years? How has eating together affected long-term relationships? Led by Phyllis Pellman Good and respondents.

W#32-R “A look at the tensions between creativity and community.” Concrete examples from LMS’ 75-year history. Led by Fred Kniss.

W#33-R “How have international students changed or enhanced the flavor and fiber of LMS?” Student life, effects on faculty and staff, influences on church and community? Led by Kirk Benner and Christy Horst, with Chung Hee ( Jane) Kim.

W#22-R “Why have so many LMS grads become leaders in social agency nonprofits and other nonprofits?” Observations and examples. Led by Kevin King and respondents.

WORKSHOP LEADERS

Kirk Benner (2000), Gap, PA. In 12th year as Director of Guidance at Lancaster Mennonite High School. Enjoys relating to students on a daily basis where majority of his caseload is working with international students, supporting their social/emotional, college/career, and personal needs.

Lena Horning Brown (1952), Denver, PA. 2008 LMS Alum of the Year. Taught in PA, Somalia, and Kenya. Served as deaconess and associate pastor at Slate Hill Mennonite Church. Active in resettlement of refugees from Vietnam and Laos. Married, with 2 children and 1 grandchild.

Preston Bush. In his 14th year of teaching Social Studies and Bible at Dock Mennonite Academy, Lansdale, PA. Formerly a Mennonite pastor and Mennonite camp program director. Married, with 2 daughters.

Jenn Esbenshade (staff), New Holland, PA. Teaches in Spanish Immersion Program at Locust Grove Campus of LMS. Lay leader in Mennonite Church for nearly 15 years and writer for various Mennonite publications. Lives on an organic farm with husband and 2 children.

Merle Good (1964), Lancaster, PA. Writer, dramatist, book publisher. Long-term volunteer with Mennonite World Conference in communication and fundraising. Current volunteer development consultant for Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society. Enjoys movies, watching football, talking politics, and good food. Married, with 2 daughters and 2 grandsons.

Phyllis Pellman Good (1966), Lancaster, PA. 2006 LMS Alum of the Year. Book editor and writer. Long-time volunteer writer, editor, and communication consultant with Mennonite World Conference. New York Times bestselling author. Active in congregation as adult SS teacher. Loves to read. Married, with 2 daughters and 2 grandsons.

Jon Heinly (2003). Currently completing MDiv at Yale Divinity School. Formerly youth minister for LMS and Lancaster Conference. Married.

Ernest Hess (1960), Lancaster, PA. Retired from LMS where he was a teacher, administrator, and guidance counselor. Also served as pastor and overseer in local Mennonite churches. Enjoys Appalachian Trail hiking with his wife Lois. Two children and 4 grandchildren.

Christy Horst (staff), Akron,PA. In 9th year as LMS Director of Admissions; includes working with international students. Husband is an English teacher at LMH; their 2 children are students at LMH.

Marcy Hostetler (staff). Director of Campus Chorale at LMS. Music Director of Ensemble and Musicians for Mennonite World Conference Assembly, “PA 2015.” Married, with two daughters. “The inspiration of a college professor, the death of a spouse, the opening of doors have all helped to open me to taking new risks and experiencing life.”

Mary Lou Weaver Houser (former staff), Lancastery, PA. Taught art at LMS for 18 years. “Finds the interplay of the artistic process and spirituality vital to my present work as an artist, spiritual director, native plant gardener, and gallery co-director at Community Mennonite Church of Lancaster.” Married, with 2 children and 2 grandchildren.

Susan Schultz Huxman, Waterloo, ON. President-Elect of Eastern Mennonite University. Currently President of Conrad Grebel University College. PhD in Communication Studies; has taught, developed programming, published, and spoken extensively in area of communications. Married, with 3 children. Member of Stirling Ave. Mennonite Church.

Elvin Kennel (1979), Parkesburg, PA. Lancaster Campus Principal. 11th of 12 siblings to graduate from LMS. Educational career split between teaching biology (14 years) and administration (18 years). Married, with two children, both recent graduates of LMS.

Chung Hee ( Jane) Kim. Director of the Selahart Institute, which helps international Korean and Chinese students navigate middle school and high school education at LMS, and elsewhere in the U.S., and gain admission to American colleges and universities. Has worked with international student admissions and academic programming since 1997 on both the East and West coasts.

David A. King, Harrisonburg, VA. Involved for over 35 years in athletic administration, elementary school through college. Currently Director of Athletics at Eastern Mennonite University. Formerly Athletic Director at LM for 14 years. Author of Overplayed: A Parent’s Guide to Sanity in the World of Youth Sports. Married, with 3 children and 2 grandchildren.

Kevin King (1976), Akron, PA. Executive Director of Mennonite Disaster Service since 2004. Formerly International Agriculture Advisor for MCC in Brazil and Jamaica. Material Resources Manager for MCC, 1991-2004. Has traveled extensively throughout North America, and to Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America, following up on many disasters. Married, with 2 children.

Fred Kniss (1974), Harrisonburg, VA. Provost at Eastern Mennonite University since 2009. Formerly Professor and Chair of Department of Sociology at Loyola University, Chicago, where he founded and directed McNamara Center for the Social Study of Religion. Enjoys gardening, reading, and movies. Married, with 2 sons.

Donald B. Kraybill (1963), Elizabethtown, PA. Senior Fellow emeritus at the Young Center of Elizabethtown College. His many books on North American Anabaptist communities include Passing on the Faith for the 50th anniversary of Lancaster Mennonite School. Married, with 2 children and 2 grandchildren.

Herb Kraybill (staff), Lancaster, PA. Spent years teaching in Ethiopia. On maintenance staff at LMS for the past 29 years. Married, with 2 children and 4 grandchildren.

Elizabeth Landis (1995), Lancaster, PA. Principal of Lancaster Mennonite Middle School and associate principal of Lancaster Mennonite High School. Former teacher in Octorara Area School District and coordinator of district’s violence and bullying prevention initiatives. Married, with 3 children.

Ruth (Detweiler) Lesher (1971), Mechanicsburg, PA. Psychologist/partner at Behavioral Healthcare Consultants in Lancaster. Serves on several Mennonite-related boards. Attends Harrisburg Brethren in Christ Church. Married, with two children who also attended LMS.

Charles Longenecker (former staff), Lititz, PA. Lancaster Co. farm boy; taught in science department at LMS for 40 years. Now enjoys staying active at Landis Homes. Married, with 4 children and 6 grandchildren.

Ann Martin, Lancaster, PA. Attorney with Gibbel Kraybill & Hess LLP. Specializes in estate planning, estate administration, elder law, special needs planning. Helps churches and other organizations understand and comply with Pennsylvania’s Child Protective Services Law. Married, with 2 children.

Darvin L. Martin, Akron, PA. Interest in local Native American history began as a quest to understand how his colonial ancestors interacted with those already living here. Through DNA discovered his own Native lineage. Blends a career of scientific research with the pursuit of his own ancestry, “seeking to determine the cultural, religious and societal norms that shaped the choices of his forebears.” Works in product management and technical sales in agricultural, environmental, and pharmaceutical industries. Has chaired Lancaster Family History Conference since 2003. Married, with 1 child.

Elaine Moyer. Senior Director of Mennonite Education Agency. Over 40 years supporting, networking, and amplifying teachers, administrators, and board members of Mennonite educational institutions that serve early childhood through seminary.

Carlos Romero, Elkhart, IN. Executive Director of Mennonite Education Agency. Thirty years in educational and denominational leadership. Specializes in working closely with youth and young adults. Actively working to improve racial/ethnic relations within Mennonite education and the church.

John D. Roth, Goshen, IN. Professor of history at Goshen College; editor of The Mennonite Quarterly Review. Director of Institute for the Study of Global Anabaptism at Goshen College; secretary of Mennonite World Conference Faith and Life Commission. Married, with 4 daughters and 2 granddaughters.

Ryan Sauder, Lancaster, PA. Assistant Dean of Academic Advancement and Senior Director of College Grants at Franklin & Marshall College, Lancaster. Focus of work is leveraging a wide variety of resources to advance the college’s liberal arts mission. Co-founder of an emerging local start-up business. Married, with 2 daughters.

Rusty Sherrick, Stevensville, PA. “My grandmother started taking me to a Mennonite Brethren Church when I was 4. My Indian-ness showed up when I was in my 30s. My family fought the whites here during the French & Indian War and the Revolutionary War, and on into 1812.”

Jim Smucker (1979). Harrisonburg, VA. Vice President for Enrollment at Eastern Mennonite University. Formerly served 27 years as President of and partner in Bird-in-Hand Corporation. Specializes in leadership and organizational change. Married, with 3 children.

J.W. Sprunger (staff), Lancaster, PA. Grew up an Indiana farm boy in a 3-generation household. Has served Mennonite Church for 40 years as a pastor, marketer, overseer, administrator, and teacher. Married, with 3 children.

J. Richard Thomas (retired LM superintendent), Lancaster, PA. Co-chair of Mennonite Schools Council PreK-12 Bible Curriculum development project. Board Member of United Way of Lancaster County; former Moderator of Mennonite Church, USA; former Chair of Mennonite Schools Council; Chair of National Advisory Committee for Mennonite World Conference Assembly, “PA 2015.” Married, with 3 children and2 grandchildren.

John M. Thomas (2002), Lancaster, PA. Production manager at Cramers’ Inc., cut flower farm in Mount Joy. Married, with 1 son.

Diane Zimmerman Umble (LM Board Chair), Lancaster, PA. Professor of Communication and Dean of the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences at Millersville University. Scholarship focuses on intersections between cultural identity and communicative practices, especially within Old Order Amish and Mennonite communities. Husband and 2 children are LMS graduates.

Beth Weaver-Kreider (1985), Wrightsville, PA. Teaches English at Lancaster Mennonite High School. Published poet. Her interest in justice and poverty can be traced to her classes at EMU and LMS. Married, with 2 sons.

Sheri Wenger (staff), Lancaster, PA. Began teaching career at Rosslyn Academy, Nairobi, 1985. Has taught social studies (Advanced Placement U.S. History, Honors Sociology, Intro to Peacebuiding, and Individual/Family Studies) at LMS since 1986. Currently serves as Instructional Area Leader for Bible/Social Studies Department. Also teaches for EMU Lancaster. Married, with 2 children.

Fred Winey (1990), Mount Joy, PA. Instructional Area Leader for LMS Health & Phys Ed department; Varsity Head Coach for boy’s soccer team. Active on worship team in congregation. Enjoys “music, reading, travel, and supporting his family in their endeavors.” Married, with a son.

Bob Wyble (1961), Akron, PA. Attended both public school and LMS. Attended Eastern Mennonite College; graduated from Millersville University. Taught biology at McCaskey High School (Lancaster) and Penn Manor High School (Millersville). Assistant principal of Warwick High School (Lititz) from 1989 until retirement in 2004. Married, with 1 son.

Miles Yoder (staff), East Lampeter Township, PA. LM Assistant Superintendent and Hershey Campus Principal. Encourages use of restorative justice and conflict resolution and has a passion for seeing students succeed. Married, with 4 children (3 LMS alums) and 5 grandchildren.

  • FOUNDERS' CIRCLE


    Harold R. '65 &

    Ruth E.A. '66 Mast

     


  • SIGNATURE SPONSORS

    Clarence H. Rutt '49

     

    Engle Printing & Publishing Co., Inc.

     

    Friends of LMS

     

    Larry W. & Janet W. Newswanger