Curriculum Guide

High School Curriculum

As a comprehensive, holistic school, LM helps students of diverse abilities and interests be all they can be. The student body includes students with academic difficulties as well as Merit Scholars; it includes those who want to work with their hands as well as those who aspire to work towards professional careers.

While some schools emphasize “academic excellence,” LM promotes integrated educational excellence that addresses the whole person and prepares them for life, not just college or academic success. While nurturing all gifts and talents, the high school program still provides academic rigor that can propel students to top-notch colleges and universities. Courses marked with an asterisk (*) in this guide are especially recommended for college-bound students.

Overall, the Lancaster Campus offers over 150 courses and programs, including AP courses, honors courses for college credit, and electives in the fields of computer technology, agriculture science, church history, art and music, among others.

The Hershey Campus also offers a well-rounded selection of courses. Click the Hershey tab to filter the Curriculum Guide or click the link to a PDF of the Hershey curriculum guide.

Filter by Campus

Agriculture education provides opportunities for learning in the applied sciences, technology and business environment. The agricultural sciences create opportunities which challenge students to apply the scientific method to areas as diverse as landscaping, forest management and animal nutrition. Students develop vocational skills and knowledge necessary for work in the local and global communities. Emphasis is placed on Christian stewardship of natural resources and biblical ethics in work and business.

601 Forestry and Environment

Grades 9-12

Lancaster

Students learn to identify many of the trees common to the northeastern United States. This course includes units on multiple uses of the forest such as lumber, energy, wildlife, conservation and reforestation. Students will also contribute to the preservation of the environment. This course may count as 0.5 Science credit.

Credits -

0.5

Duration -

1st semester

602 Wildlife and Fisheries Science

10-12

Lancaster

Students will learn about the different aspects and career opportunities of wildlife and fisheries management and natural resource conservation. This course will include units on identification, habitat management, and small mammal study. Outdoor activities and studies will use the campus woodlands and aquatic areas as an outdoor lab. The course may count as 0.5 science credit.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

603 Animal Biotechnology

9-12

Lancaster

Students explore practical aspects of animal reproduction, nutrition and health. Units include dairy, swine, beef and horses. This course provides an excellent foundation for agri-business careers, farmers and introductory vet-science for college freshmen. This course may count as 0.5 Science credit.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

606 Construction Technology

11-12

Lancaster

Students learn the basics of electrical wiring, plumbing, and masonry. Students order material for a utility shed, lay out a floor plan and design simple roof trusses. Students also construct one or more storage type buildings. Students will pay for parts, materials used, as well as a small deposit for safety equipment.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

607 Power Technology – Small Engines

9-12

Lancaster

This course provides students with an excellent theoretical and practical background in operating, maintaining, trouble shooting and repairing of small gasoline engines. Anyone planning to own a car or other motorized equipment will benefit from this course. Students will pay for parts, materials used, as well as a deposit for safety equipment. This course counts as 0.5 science credit.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

608 Horticulture

9-12

Lancaster

Students learn knowledge and skills involved with greenhouse management, plant propagation, integrated pest management (IPM), and landscape work. The landscape component may include developing a landscape plan. This course involves many hands-on lab activities, and during spring weather, students work outdoors in practical landscape care. This course counts as 0.5 science credit.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

2nd semester

609 Welding and Mechanics Technology

11-12

Lancaster

Emphasis is on modern processes of joining and separating steel, sheet metal, etc. Skills are learned using the arc welder, plasma cutter, mig welder, assembly and equipment restoration. Student projects include steel fabrication, tractor restoration and large engines. Students will pay for parts and materials used, as well as a deposit for safety equipment. Students interested in advanced welding training should plan to take both semesters.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

610 Introduction to Ag Science

9-10

Lancaster

A leadership class for beginning FFA members where students learn management entrepreneurship, record keeping and other skills required for success in the FFA and in future business operations. The impact of Pennsylvania’s agricultural commodities in the global marketplace will be taught through team projects. Highly recommended for first year FFA members. This course may count as 0.5 Global Studies credit.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

2nd semester

611 Ag Business Economics

11-12

Lancaster

Economic principles are taught in an atmosphere of discussion. Classroom projects that simulate real-life situations encourage students to explore management strategies that maximize profits. Students learn how to manage credit for personal and business purposes. Meets requirements for Economics in the Social Studies department.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st semester

As a means of communication, the visual arts enable a student to observe, explore, and respond to life through many media and design skills. Discovering the creative process can draw one to the ultimate creator—God. Art courses cultivate reflection, criticism, and aesthetic sensitivity to cultural expressions worldwide. This awareness and appreciation for all of God's earth and people lead to constructive creativity and career choices which nurture our global society.


Courses with the ** are considered foundational courses for students pursuing an art career.

201 Artbeat

Grades 9-12

Lancaster

An excellent foundation for all the other art electives, this course focuses on what art is and why people create it. Students work with a variety of media and techniques, including drawing, painting, sculpting, and working with clay. Weekly lessons in art history help students appreciate a wide variety of art and artists.

Credits -

0.5

Duration -

1st semester

**202 Two-Dimensional Design

9-12

Lancaster

Learn to use the elements and principles of design to create exciting two-dimensional art work. Students will experiment with many techniques and media (pen and ink, colored pencils, acrylic paints, pastels, and more). Units in basic design, printmaking, and commercial art (typography and lay-out) are included in this studio course.

Credits -

.5

Prerequisites -

Artbeat or equivalent

Duration -

1st semester

203 Art in Action

9-12

Lancaster

Students put their artistic skills to active use beyond the classroom. Students will produce art with practical applications such as murals, illustration for publication, program covers, arts in chapel, public art and others. Group and individual projects may integrate art with skills from other disciplines. Emphasis on good design, excellent craftsmanship, communicating positive values, exploring career options and service to school and community.

Credits -

.5

Prerequisites -

Artbeat or equivalent

Duration -

2nd semester, alternate years. Offered 2017-2018.

204 Drawing

9-12

Lancaster

Emphasis is on learning to see. Basic drawing skills are developed along with experiments utilizing many techniques (contour, gesture, value) and media (pen and ink, brush, conte', charcoal, scratch board). Daily sketchbook assignments focus on development of specific drawing skills.

Credits -

.5

Prerequisites -

Artbeat or equivalent

Duration -

2nd semester

**206 Painting

10-12

Lancaster

This studio course provides experience in acrylic and watercolor painting. Emphasis is on color theory and the elements and principles of design. Students will experiment with unusual materials (sand, salt, rice paper), colors, and textures to enhance their paintings. (Lab fee $25)

Credits -

.5

Prerequisites -

Drawing or instructor's permission.

Duration -

2nd semester

**207 Sculptural Design

9-12

Lancaster

Learning to use the elements and principles of design in their projects, students create three-dimensional forms in a variety of media, including wire, plaster, stone, clay and found objects. Studies in art history focus on the prehistoric to modern art periods.

Credits -

.5

Prerequisites -

Artbeat or equivalent

Duration -

1st semester

**211 Advanced Studio

11-12

Lancaster

Students will study their choice of drawing, painting, or three-dimensional design by following Advanced Placement Portfolio Guidelines. Course work combines art theory (self-paced study), sketchbook assignments, discussions, and independent projects. (Lab fee $25)

Credits -

.5

Prerequisites -

Artbeat, Drawing and Painting or 2-D or 3-D; or special permission from an art instructor.

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

214 Digital Photography

9-12

Lancaster

Students continue making photographs, learning to use all the capabilities of their cameras, and improving the design of their images. Emphasis is on learning to use digital cameras, scanners, Photoshop and desktop printers for doing photography as well as continuing to develop “a photographic eye.” Class members sharpen their basic image editing (Photoshop) skills, as well as learn more advanced Photoshop tools such as curves, layers and masks. Ethical issues relating to digital imagery are explored. The course affords students the opportunity to do color photography, and helps students get started in photojournalism, commercial photography and fine art photography directions. Students must have access to a digital still camera capable of making images of at least 5-6 Megapixels. Highly recommended for student publications photographers. (Lab fee $40)

Credits -

.5

Prerequisites -

Grade of "B-" or higher in Introduction to Photography.

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

216 Ceramics

9-12

Lancaster

Hand-building techniques and wheel-throwing skills are the focus of this course. Works by master potters and crafts persons are studied in conjunction with student projects. Both functional and sculptural/design assignments provide a wide range of experience in clay. Meets two periods a day. (Lab Fee $30)

Credits -

1.0

Prerequisites -

Artbeat or equivalent

Duration -

2nd semester.

217 Introduction to Photography

9-12

Lancaster

This course is an introduction to the field of Photography, both “classic” photography (film cameras, silver-based technology, wet darkroom, black-and-white photographs) and digital photography (computer “darkroom,” Photoshop, output to the web and to paper prints). Students learn to use their cameras better, to take more interesting, better-designed photographs, and to work with silver and digital methods for doing photography. Students must have access to a 35mm film camera capable of being used manually (LMH has film cameras for rent if necessary) and a digital camera. An excellent foundation for all other photography classes. Required for student publication photographers. (Lab fee $75)

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

220 Survey of Western Art

11-12

Lancaster

This college level course is a survey approach to the history and appreciation of Western art that examines the ways in which religious, social, political and philosophical concepts have been expressed in art. This course is an online dual enrollment course taught by an Eastern Mennonite University professor. Students must register with EMU and pay a fee for 3 college credits and technology. Optional Textbook: Art: A Brief History.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

Drawing 1

9-12

Hershey

Students will begin a series of studio projects, which focus on drawing and design related skills. Various media such as charcoal, pencil and paint may be used as a means of investigating these skills. Emphasis will be placed on developing the students’ observational and compositional skill through the drawing discipline. Discussions and critiques will stress the improvement of technique.

Credits -

.3

Drawing 2

9-12

Hershey

Students will begin a series of studio projects, which focus on drawing and design related skills. Various media such as charcoal, pencil and paint may be used as a means of investigating these skills. Emphasis will be placed on developing the students’ observational and compositional skill through the drawing discipline. Art as a means of expression or voice will be introduced. Discussions and critiques will stress the improvement of technique and expression.

Credits -

.3

Prerequisites -

No prerequisite

Painting 1

9-12

Hershey

Students will begin a series of studio projects, which focus on painting and design related skills. Various media such as charcoal, acrylic and oil paint may be used as a means of investigating these skills. Emphasis will be placed on developing the students’ observational and compositional skills through the painting process. Discussions and critiques will stress the improvement of technique.

Credits -

.3

Painting 2

9-12

Hershey

Students will begin a series of studio projects, which focus on painting and design related skills. Various media such as charcoal, acrylic and oil paint may be used as a means of investigating these skills. Emphasis will be placed on developing the students’ observational and compositional skills through the painting process. Art as a means of expression or voice will be introduced. Discussions and critiques will stress the improvement of technique and expression.

Credits -

.3

Prerequisites -

No prerequisite

213 Photography II (Silver-based)

10-12

Lancaster

This course emphasizes broadening and deepening photographic skills for students who love working in a traditional darkroom. Students explore creative use of camera controls, existing and studio lighting, flash techniques, the history of photography and principles of good composition. Class members make portraits, learn special darkroom techniques and become “master printers.” The class also chooses from a variety of projects, which often include photographing with antique cameras, hand coloring photographs, doing pinhole photography, completing a color photography project and more. (Lab fee $100)

Credits -

.5

Prerequisites -

Grade "B-" or higher in Introduction to Photography.

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

Sculpture 1

9-12

Hershey

Students will begin a series of studio projects, focusing on 3-dimensional design skills. Clay will be the primary medium used to explore these skills. Emphasis will be placed on developing the students’ understanding of 3-dimensional forms through the sculpting process. Discussions and critiques will stress the improvement of technique.

Credits -

.3

Sculpture 2

9-12

Hershey

Students will begin a series of studio projects, which focus on three dimensional design skills. Clay will be the primary medium used to explore these skills. Emphasis will be placed on developing the students’ understanding of three-dimensional forms through the sculpting process. Art as a means of expression or voice will be introduced. Discussions and critiques will stress the improvement of technique and expression.

Credits -

.3

Prerequisites -

No prerequisite

The Bible curriculum at Lancaster Mennonite is designed to teach biblical truth, strengthen Christian convictions and assist youth in their faith journey. God is recognized as Creator of the universe. The message of God's power and faithfulness is presented through the biblical story. We believe God's ultimate revelation has come in the incarnation of Jesus Christ.

Students are challenged to make Jesus both Savior and Lord of their lives. Students learn how the Church grew . from a small group of believers in Palestine into the global body of Christ. Similarities and differences of Christianity's major branches are surveyed to discern their fundamental tenants of faith. The Sermon on the Mount and the Epistles become foundational as students are called to personal faith and a life of peacemaking,
servanthood and mission.

101 Creation and Promise

Required Course

9

Lancaster

This Bible course takes a thematic view of God’s narrative with humanity. The course begins with an introduction and overview the Bible. Following the Old Testament narrative, the themes covered in this course include: caring for God’s creation; listening to God’s voice; living God’s way; and working for God’s shalom. Each theme is studied using stories from the Old Testament, New Testament and more modern stories of God’s interaction with humanity. The themes of the course align with the Anabaptist Faith Practice Statements of Lancaster Mennonite School. Required.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

103 Jesus’ Story

Required Course

10

Lancaster

This Bible course takes a thematic view of God’s narrative with humanity. The course begins with an introduction and overview of the New Testament. Following the life of Jesus, the themes covered in this course include: following God’s call to love; being known and loved by God; celebrating diversity; being a citizen in the upside-down Kingdom; and practicing grace and forgiveness. Each theme is studied using stories from the Old Testament, New Testament and more modern stories of God’s interaction with humanity. The themes of the course align with the Anabaptist Faith Practice Statements of Lancaster Mennonite School. Required.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

104 Global Christianity

Required Course

11

Lancaster

This class is a study of Global Christianity from the birth of the church through the formation of Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodox and other non-Western Christian faith streams, and the Reformation with an emphasis on the rise of the Anabaptist movement. This is followed by a study of the development and growth of the Anabaptist movement in North America and around the globe, other denominations, the rise of non-denominational churches and the Pentecostal movement. The class examines the current relationship between Christianity and culture, including other world religions, in settings around the world. Students are helped to understand their faith as they study Christianity in a global context. Required.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

105 Introduction to Bible

9-12

Lancaster

This course is designed to introduce international students to the Bible. Topics include navigation of the Bible, the God of the Bible, the rise of Christianity as a religion, and the concept of Church and Christian celebrations. In this course students will learn of key stories from the Old and New Testaments.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

105 Kingdom Living

Required Course

12

Lancaster

The themes for this course are: philosophy and theology; engaging with world religions; spiritual disciplines; and living in God’s Kingdom. This senior level Bible course challenges students to reflect on their own faith journey and culminates with a capstone project that focuses on an area of interest/service for the student, and how that interest/service connects to their own personal faith journey. Required.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

112 Spiritual Formation

12

Lancaster

This is a dual enrollment course with Eastern Mennonite University. This course may be taken instead of Kingdom Living and serves as an introduction to Christian Spiritual Formation, its roots in history as well as its present day implications on both a personal and communal level. It is grounded in the understanding that God is always active in our lives and in the world around us. Spiritual disciplines are one way that we open our eyes, ears, and hearts to God’s message for us and for the world. Looking and listening to God’s movement enables us to comprehend in a deeper way what it means to be a follower of Jesus in our broken world. Lectures, readings, discussions, papers, journal entries, meeting with a spiritual companion, weekly experiences with a small group and a class retreat form the basis for mutual learning. There is a cost for the dual enrollment and retreat.

Credits -

.5

Prerequisites -

Grade 12 students with a "B" or higher average.

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

Bible Study Elective

9-12

Hershey

This course will explore a variety of Bible passages in depth and will challenge students to examine ways in which applications can be made to their lives today. Bible passages to study will be chosen by students and the instructor. Class time will include prayer, individual and corporate Bible reading and research, group discussions and presentations. All students, regardless of prior Bible experience, are welcome to take this course.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

Global Christianity

11-12

Hershey

This class is a study of Global Christianity from the birth of the church through the formation of Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodox and other non-Western Christian faith streams, and the Reformation with an emphasis on the rise of the Anabaptist movement. This is followed by a study of the development and growth of the Anabaptist movement in North America and around the globe, other denominations, the rise of non-denominational churches and the Pentecostal movement. The class examines the current relationship between Christianity and culture, including other world religions, in settings around the world. Students are helped to understand their faith as they study Christianity in a global context.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

2nd semester

Jesus’ Story

9-10

Hershey

This Bible course takes a thematic view of God’s narrative with humanity. The course begins with an introduction and overview of the New Testament. Following the life of Jesus, the themes covered in this course include: Following God’s call to love; Being known and loved by God; Celebrating diversity; Being a citizen in the upside-down Kingdom; and Practicing grace and forgiveness. Each theme is studied using stories from the Old Testament, New Testament and more modern stories of God’s interaction with humanity. The themes of the course align with the Anabaptist Faith Practice Statements of Lancaster Mennonite School.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st semester

The Business, Computer, and Information Technology curriculum is designed to meet the students' personal and career objectives, equipping students for the world of work, further education or mission. Emphasis is placed on both technical and personal skills necessary for success in the modern global business community. Course work is designed to build a basic understanding of the world of business. An emphasis on ethics and stewardship challenges students to be responsible Christian citizens.

620 Personal Finance

10-12

Lancaster

Concepts of personal financial management are examined from a Christian perspective. Emphasis is placed on career choice, preparing budgets, keeping personal income and expense records, completing simple tax returns, using credit, and understanding banking. Investments and risk management will be explored. This course may count as 0.5 math credit.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

2nd semester

*621/622 Financial Accounting

10-12

Lancaster

Financial accounting will introduce students to fundamental aspects of financial accounting. Students will learn to prepare accounting entries, financial statements and how to analyze the work presented. Additionally, students will be faced with real-world situations that business professionals are faced with on a daily basis. A strong emphasis will be placed on teamwork and communication skills.

Credits -

1.0

Duration -

Yearlong

*630 Entrepreneurship

11-12

Lancaster

This course will teach students the skills needed to establish and manage a business and the characteristics required of a successful entrepreneur. Students will study and develop a business plan. Other topics studied include marketing, distribution, promotion, selling, financial management, and operations management.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

2nd semester

632 Introduction to Business

9-12

Lancaster

This course is a basic business course which introduces students to the world of business. Topics include the business environment, forms of business organization, management and leadership, human resources, and financial management. The course meets the requirements for Economics in the Social Studies Department.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st semester

633 Contemporary Business

11-12

Lancaster

This is a dual enrollment, fully online Harrisburg Area Community College (HACC) course (HACC BUSI-101) taught by an LMS teacher with HACC adjunct faculty status. Students will be enrolled at both HACC and LMH, registering with HACC, receiving a HACC email, HACC grade, HACC credit (3), and HACC transcript. The course introduces students to the world of business. Topics include business environment, forms of business organizations, management and leadership, human resources, and financial management. This course meets the requirements for economics in the Social Studies Department. Students must pay a fee to HACC for 3 college credits and technology.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

634 Business Law

11-12

Lancaster

The importance of business law in everyday life is emphasized and provides practical guidelines for becoming practical consumers - both now and later. Topics covered are an introduction to law, contracts, bailments, employment, and property. A variety of application activities are provided to help reinforce legal principles studied.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

2nd semester

637 Business Math

10-12

Lancaster

This course will strengthen the student's everyday math skills. Students review fundamental math principles. Calculations will be learned that apply to business applications, including income, manufacturing, sales, marketing and distribution. This course may count as 0.5 math credit.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st semester

Advanced Digital Photography

12

Hershey

This course is designed to move students beyond the basics and into more advanced topics and assignments. The students will be introduced to image editing techniques using Adobe Lightroom, to enhance and complete their photography assignments. Occasional photographyrelated field trips and site explorations will also be conducted to allow students to have photo opportunities beyond the school grounds.

Credits -

.3

Prerequisites -

"A" in Digital Photography or instructor recommendation.

Duration -

2nd semester

AP Computer Science Principles

10-12

Hershey

With a unique focus on creative problem solving and real-world applications, the AP Computer Science Principles course gives students the opportunity to explore several important topics of computing including Web Development, Programming, Digital Information, The Internet and Data. Students will use their own ideas and creativity to create artifacts of personal value including a final collaborative project. This course will also develop an interest in computer science that will foster further endeavors in the field. This course counts for math or science credit.

Credits -

1.0

Prerequisites -

Algebra 1

Duration -

Full year

Digital Photography

10

Hershey

This course introduces students to the various aspects of digital photography and image editing. Emphasis will be placed on both technical and artistic aspects of photography and composition. Students will create and manipulate digital images with emphasis on improving technique and composition. There is a $10.00 supplies fee for this course.

Credits -

.3

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

Digital Video Editing

9

Hershey

This course is designed to introduce students to the process of capturing, importing, editing and exporting digital video. This course aims to give students a basic knowledge of creating and editing small video productions such as short films, commercials, and interviews. Students will learn how to operate digital cameras for capture, light a set/scene, use video production software, and then export the video for sharing.

Credits -

.3

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

Intro to Adobe Photoshop

11

Hershey

In today’s world of computers, technology and imagery, Adobe Photoshop reigns supreme as the industry standard image editing and manipulation programing. This class will focus on image post-processing and manipulation. Students will learn how to improve, alter and combine images in a variety of ways, while building their understanding and use of Adobe Photoshop Elements software. The use of these skills will further student abilities in working with photo manipulation software as well as develop an understanding of the use of a computer in digital imagery.

Credits -

.3

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

Introduction to Business: Contemporary Business

11-12

Hershey

This is a dual enrollment, fully online Harrisburg Area Community College (HACC) course (HACC BUSI-101) taught by an LMS teacher with HACC adjunct faculty status. Students will be enrolled at both HACC and LMH, registering with HACC, receiving a HACC email, HACC grade, HACC credit (3), and HACC transcript. The course introduces students to the world of business. Topics include business environment, forms of business organizations, management and leadership, human resources, and financial management. This course meets the requirements for Economics in the Social Studies Department. Students must pay a fee to HACC for 3 college credits and technology.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

Programming

12

Hershey

Students will be introduced to basic programming constructs and skills associated with building web and mobile applications using the JavaScript programming language.

Credits -

.3

Duration -

1st semester

Yearbook

11-12

Hershey

Students will produce the school’s annual yearbook by taking photographs, designing layouts and organizing all of the book’s components for printing and production. Students will learn responsibility and punctuality in completing assigned tasks and projects under publication deadlines. Students will work together as a group to complete a collective project through individual contributions. Students will need to apply to be approved for this course.

Credits -

.4

Duration -

Full year

Cooperative Programs with the Lancaster County Career and Technology Centers and Millersville University
of Pennsylvania (MU).

654 and 646 Career & Technology

Grades 11-12

Lancaster

A cooperative program with Lancaster County Career and Technology Centers. Juniors and seniors could be eligible for part-time or full-time 646 enrollment in certain vocational programs offered through the Lancaster County Career & Technology Center (LCCTC). A variety of programs are available related to the following fields: cosmetology, construction, technologies and visual communication. Descriptions of programs can be found online. Career and technology center students will complete a project at LCCTC that will count for their senior presentation. Anyone interested should consult with their school counselor as early as the sophomore year to plan accordingly. Students in full day classes at the Career and Technology Center will be charged a records fee. Additional part time fees are charged for students taking one or more classes on the Lancaster Campus. Records fee for the 2015-16 year was $168.

Credits -

3.0 or 6.0 credits available

Pre College Music Division at Millersville University

Grades 9-12

Lancaster

Through a special partnership program, Lancaster Mennonite High School students who desire a special music focus in their curriculum can apply to take classes in the Pre College Music Division at Millersville University of Pennsylvania (MU). Successfully completed courses are added to the student’s high school transcript. An individualized plan is designed for each participating student. Some of the courses offered are: Music History, Chamber Music, Music Theory (Kodály Concept), Choir, Ensemble, Orchestra, Composition, and Independent Lessons. Interested students should contact their school counselor.

Diversified Occupations and Service is designed to benefit both students who will enter the job market after graduation and those who continue their formal education. Diversified Occupations and Service educates students to realize the many occupational opportunities in society and to evaluate their interests and abilities. It also enables them to acquire valuable skills and knowledge, and to provide the opportunity for realistic job experiences. Students are helped to understand that to be a Christian is our primary vocation regardless of how we may earn a living.

644 Diversified Occupations

12

Lancaster

Students will be required to be in the classroom the first few days of class to complete required paperwork. This class provides students with the opportunity to receive occupational instruction and realistic on-the-job experiences that cannot be offered in the classroom setting. Students are required to find their own employment with an employer who is willing to participate in such a program. Students are required to work at least 15 hours a week for the full semester, usually during the three afternoon classes and in many cases until 5:00 p.m. International students must have valid U.S. working papers. The students will also plan and attend a breakfast banquet for all of the employers at the end of the semester. The program is flexible to meet the needs of individual students.

Credits -

1.0

Duration -

2nd semester

651 Service

9-12

Lancaster

Service provides students an opportunity to help a teacher. No credit is given for this experience.

Credits -

.0

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

652 Peer Tutoring

9-12

Lancaster

Students will have the opportunity to explore the teaching profession working in Learning Support or with middle school students. They will contribute to the education of individual students or small groups of students through individualization, modeling, motivation, and develop an understanding of similarities they share. Students participating in this program must have a satisfactory school conduct grade and need to be approved by the faculty member they are working with and a guidance counselor. Students should indicate their interest in Peer Tutoring on their course selection form each year.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

702 Driver Education (Classroom)

Driver Education classroom training is incorporated into the Health/Safety Education class. See courses 701/702 under Health, Safety, and Physical Education.

702 Driver Education (Behind-the-Wheel)

This phase of driver education consists of six hours of actual behind-the-wheel instruction in the car. Instruction is available to students with learner's permits or licenses. Students are placed on a rotating schedule so that they miss a different set of classes each time they drive. Students getting their permits in May, June, or July are encouraged to contact their local public schools to get behind-the-wheel training during the summer months. Students do not register for behind-the-wheel training as a separate course. As soon as a student receives his/her learner's permit from the state, he/she shall report his/her desire for behind-the-wheel training to the school office. The fee is set annually. Fee for 2015-16 was $350.

Community Service

9-12

Hershey

Gives opportunities for students to become active in their community and church. Students will receive course credit for volunteering in their community and/or church. Students choose their area to volunteer and give 15 hours of service a marking period. Students will also be required to keep a journal of their experience.

Credits -

.2 credit/semester

Duration -

1st and/or 2nd semester

General Acting

9-12

Hershey

Students explore the art of acting in a theater setting. In this semester-long course, students will learn many techniques for actors and apply them through a variety of in-class activities and final scene performance.

Credits -

.1

Duration -

1st semester

Internship

12

Hershey

Students interested in a particular career will complete either a full year of internship service at one work place related to that career or two semesters of internship at two different work places related to that career. Student interns will gain a deeper understanding of what that particular career entails. This program will help students solidify their major and career paths before entering post-secondary school education/fields.

Credits -

1.0

Duration -

Full year

Shadowing

11-12

Hershey

Students will find and visit two different work places in which they have an interest in pursuing a career (four if choosing this elective for two semesters). At least three (3) hours must be spent “shadowing” someone at each site. Student should take notes as they are shadowing an individual at any given establishment (recording observations, jotting down personal thoughts, asking appropriate questions, writing down responses, etc.).

Credits -

.2 credit/semester

Duration -

1st and/or 2nd semester

Student Tutoring

9-12

Hershey

This elective is designed to give course credit to those students who are academically strong in a certain subject area and who desire to be peer tutors. These students will meet one 45 minute period per week with an Elementary School, Middle School or High School student for tutoring sessions. Student tutors will learn how to do simple lesson plans and acquire teaching skills as they tutor other students. Student tutors will be required to keep a journal of their experience.

Credits -

.1 credit/semester

Prerequisites -

Student tutors must maintain a 90% or higher average in the subject being tutored.

Duration -

1st and/or 2nd semester

Teacher Assistance

9-12

Hershey

This course gives students, interested in a teaching career, an opportunity to learn more about this field through assisting our teachers in the elementary grades. Students will volunteer with an elementary teacher twice a week during the school year. They will perform various tasks from grading papers to helping students when needed. Responsibilities will vary from teacher to teacher. Students will be required to keep a journal of their experience. Note that there are limited slots available for this elective and that first choice will be given to upperclassmen.

Credits -

.1 credit/semester

Duration -

1st and/or 2nd semester

The study of language arts develops the communication skills students will need in their work place, in further education and in service for the Kingdom of God. As students read and respond to literature from various times and cultures, they begin to understand more about themselves, the world, and questions and values of their society. Learning critical thinking skills enables students to become discerning consumers of mass media. By reading on a regular basis, students establish reading habits which provide lifelong recreation and access to information. Thinking and communication skills enable students to articulate their ideas, feelings, values and faith.

218A/218B Foundations of English

9-10

Lancaster

This is a skill-building course designed to prepare students to develop the necessary literacy skills to succeed in English 101, and to provide a foundation in reading level development, vocabulary building, writing and editing strategies, and study skills. Students may only take this course at the recommendation of Learning Support, Guidance, or the teacher.

Credits -

1.0

Duration -

Yearlong

221A/221B English 101

Required Course

9-10

Lancaster

Writing, grammar, and vocabulary are studied in conjunction with literature. Units of study include short stories, drama, poetry, nonfiction, ancient epic, and the novel.

Credits -

1.0

Duration -

Yearlong

237 Communication and Analysis

Required Course

11

Lancaster

The purpose of this course is to study and practice the life skills of listening, speaking, and writing. This media literacy course emphasizes the organization and presentation of information for various purposes and audiences. Contemporary uses of media, including entertainment and advertising are analyzed and evaluated from a Christian perspective. Semester course required of all juniors.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

English 101

9

Hershey

Writing, grammar, and vocabulary are studied in conjunction with literature. Units of study include short stories, drama, poetry, nonfiction, ancient epic, and the novel.

Credits -

1.0

Duration -

Full year

233 Academic Writing

10-12

Lancaster

This course focuses on advancing and strengthening critical thinking and academic writing skills. Students write several short papers including essays and a short research paper. Academic Writing is a prerequisite to Advanced Writing.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

*235 Advanced Writing

11-12

Lancaster

Students are guided through the writing of several papers, including an extensive research paper. This course for college-bound students practices a peer revision model to give and receive feedback.

Credits -

.5

Prerequisites -

Academic Writing

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

240 Writing Skills

10-12

Lancaster

This course addresses the basic writing skills needed to succeed in Academic Writing and literature courses. Emphasis is on sentence structure, paragraph structure, grammar, and mechanics.

Credits -

.5

Prerequisites -

Teacher recommendation

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

245 Career English

11-12

Lancaster

Students learn the written and oral communication skills necessary to get a job and function well in a work environment.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

*250 English Composition I (Advanced Placement)

11-12

Lancaster

Designed to develop fluency in writing clear, forceful, and effective prose, this course, when taken in conjunction with Introduction to Literature (AP), is intended to prepare students to take the AP Literature and Composition exam for college credit. By paying an additional registration fee and course fee and taking a placement exam, students may receive college credit for this course through Harrisburg Area Community College (HACC). All students registering for English Composition I must take and pass HACC’s placement exam. This is a weighted class.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

2nd semester

Academic Writing

10-12

Hershey

This course focuses on advancing and strengthening critical thinking and academic writing skills. Students write several short papers including essays and a short research paper.

Credits -

.5

Advanced Writing

11-12

Hershey

Students are guided through the writing of several papers, including an extensive research paper. This course for college-bound students practices a peer revision model to give and receive feedback.

Credits -

.5

Career English

10-12

Hershey

Students learn the written and oral communication skills necessary to get a job and function well in a work environment.

Credits -

.5

Communication and Analysis

10-12

Hershey

The purpose of this course is to study and practice the life skills of listening, speaking, and writing. This media literacy course emphasizes the organization and presentation of information for various purposes and audiences. Contemporary uses of media, including entertainment and advertising are analyzed and evaluated from a Christian perspective.

Credits -

.5

Writing Skills

10-12

Hershey

This course addresses the basic writing skills needed to succeed in Academic Writing and literature courses. Emphasis is on sentence structure, paragraph structure, grammar, and mechanics.

Credits -

.5

226 Literature of the Christian Faith

10-12

Lancaster

Selected works of various types from Christian writers are studied as literature and as inspirational writings. The use of Christian themes by non-Christian authors is also noted.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester, alternate years. Offered 2017-2018.

229 Themes in Literature

10-12

Lancaster

The literature studied is organized around themes of high interest to students. Themes include death, love, courage, and friendship.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

*230 British Literature

10-12

Lancaster

Students study the major authors of the principal literary periods from Beowulf to 20th century poetry such as Shakespeare and Romanticism, and become aware of recurring themes that link students of today with people of all times.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

2nd semester

234 Literature of the Bible

10-12

Lancaster

The artistic dimension of the Bible is emphasized through careful study of various types of literature found in it and through the study of biblical influence in literature, art, and music.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester, alternate years. Offered 2018-2019.

*236 Advanced Reading

11-12

Lancaster

Designed for the student with above average ability and self-discipline, this course allows students to plan their own curriculum from a list of books suggested for the college bound. Students receive guidance in reading critically and respond in writing and orally to each book read.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

2nd semester

*244 U.S. Literature

10-12

Lancaster

A survey course sampling United States literature from the colonial times through the 20th century, U.S. Literature will explore how works relate to their historical and social contexts, the Christian worldview, and their writers’ view of life. U.S. Literature will correlate to the AP U.S. History curriculum.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

*246 World Literature

10-12

Lancaster

Students will examine classic and contemporary world literature, exploring thematic threads which connect the works despite their varied cultural traditions, helping to broaden the students’ perspectives. Designed for the student with above average ability and self-discipline, this course allows students to plan their own curriculum from a list of books suggested for the college bound. Students receive guidance in critical reading and respond orally and in writing to each book.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

*259 Introduction to Literature (Advanced Placement)

12

Lancaster

Designed to develop understanding and to increase human experience through literature, this college level course, when taken in conjunction with English Composition I, is intended to prepare students to take the AP Literature and Composition exam for college credit. The major literary types (poetry, fiction, and drama) are defined and illustrated through examples drawn from English and American literature as well as other literatures of the world. By paying an additional registration fee and course fee and taking a placement exam, students may receive college credit for this course through Harrisburg Area Community College (HACC). This is a weighted class.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st semester

Literature of the Christian Faith

10-12

Hershey

Selected works of various types from Christian writers are studied as literature and as inspirational writings. The use of Christian themes by non-Christian authors is also noted.

Credits -

.5

Themes in Literature

10-12

Hershey

The literature studied is organized around themes of high interest to students. Themes include death, love, courage, and friendship.

Credits -

.5

U.S. Literature

10-12

Hershey

A survey course sampling United States literature from the colonial times through the 20th century, U.S. Literature will explore how works relate to their historical and social contexts, the Christian worldview, and their writers’ view of life. U.S. Literature will correlate to the AP U.S. History curriculum.

Credits -

.5

World Literature

10-12

Hershey

Students will examine classic and contemporary world literature, exploring thematic threads which connect the works despite their varied cultural traditions, helping to broaden the students’ perspectives. Designed for the student with above average ability and self-discipline, this course allows students to plan their own curriculum from a list of books suggested for the college bound. Students receive guidance in critical reading and respond orally and in writing to each book.

Credits -

.5

227 Journalism

10-12

Lancaster

This course introduces students to the various types and styles of journalistic writing. An elective course, Journalism is recommended for students considering applying to school publications.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st semester

247 Yearbook

11-12

Lancaster

Staff members use a period daily to work on the yearbook. Only students already appointed to the staff should include this in their schedule. Students receive a pass or fail grade.

Credits -

.25

Prerequisites -

Journalism, Photography, and/or Two-dimensional Design (recommended)

Duration -

1st semester

*248 Speech

11-12

Lancaster

Students learn to deal with fear and nervousness and to be confident and effective in a speaking situation. Class activities include group discussions, extemporaneous and memorized speeches, and critiques. An emphasis is on applying speech skills outside of class.

Credits -

.5

Prerequisites -

Communication and Analysis

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

249 Creative Writing

11-12

Lancaster

The writing of short stories, poetry, and plays encourages imaginative expression. For students who enjoy writing and are ready for a challenge.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

261 Drama: Performance

11-12

Lancaster

This class introduces the art of drama as communication. Students are challenged to develop skill in vocal articulation, projection, improvisation, stage presence, and familiarization with dramatic terms.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

2nd semester

262 Ecology and Science Fiction

11-12

Lancaster

This is a dual enrollment course with Eastern Mennonite University. This college level course focuses on stories, either as graphic novels, books, or film, that give us hope for the future or terrify us toward making change. Stories can make us feel content or they can cast a vision for a better future. The narratives we consume shape our worldview all the while providing entertainment. This book-club-like course explores the common themes of ecology and theology expressed through the vision of various science fiction authors, both classic and new. Required Textbook: Science Fiction: A Very Brief Introduction Students must register with EMU and pay a fee for 3 college credits and technology.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

264 Theatre and Justice

11-12

Lancaster

This is an online dual enrollment course with Eastern Mennonite University. Theatre is one of many powerful tools used to address injustice in the world. In this course, students will research and analyze various theatre artists, dramatic literature, productions and theorists that use theatre as their medium for change in the world. Particular emphasis will be on identifying the actors and the stage that comprise the theatre of social and other online communities. Required Textbooks: Engaging Performance: Theatre as Call and Response Students must register with EMU and pay a fee for 3 college credits and technology.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

Journalism

9-12

Hershey

This course introduces students to the various types and styles of journalistic writing.

Credits -

.1

Duration -

1st semester

Speech

9-12

Hershey

Students learn to deal with fear and nervousness and to be confident and effective in a speaking situation. Class activities include group discussions, extemporaneous and memorized speeches, and critiques. An emphasis is on applying speech skills outside of class.

Credits -

.1

Duration -

2nd semester

Theatre and Justice

11-12

Hershey

This is an online dual enrollment course with Eastern Mennonite University. Theatre is one of many powerful tools used to address injustice in the world. In this course, students will research and analyze various theatre artists, dramatic literature, productions and theorists that use theatre as their medium for change in the world. Particular emphasis will be on identifying the actors and the stage that comprise the theatre of social and other online communities. Required Textbooks: Engaging Performance: Theatre as Call and Response Students must register with EMU and pay a fee for 3 college credits and technology.

Credits -

.5

ESL classes serve students who are learning English as a non-native language. The goal of ESL is to bring students to a level of English proficiency whereby they can participate fully in other academic courses and transition successfully to post-secondary education.
Initial placement for incoming students is based primarily on the English proficiency test score submitted with the student’s application (TOEFL iBT, TOEFL JR, ITEP SLATE or IELTS).

Movement between levels is determined by teacher recommendations, grades in ESL and other courses, and updated proficiency test scores. It is not uncommon for students to remain at the same level for multiple semesters. Since most colleges require a TOEFL iBT score of at least 80 for admission, students who desire to exit the high school ESL program are expected to score at least near that level.

Additional fees are charged for all levels of ESL. Fees are adjusted each semester to reflect the student’s current level. Please refer to our website or contact our business office for current ESL fees.

222A/222B ESL Level 2

9-12

Lancaster

Level 2 focuses on improving students’ basic English skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Class work and assignments are designed to help students increase their vocabulary and communication skills in order to participate in school life and work toward functioning in a regular classroom. Students in Level 2 do not take another English class. ESL Level 2 meets for three periods each day.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

223A/223B ESL Level 3

9-12

Lancaster

Level 3 serves to help improve students' English communication skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening to a level where they can begin to function in a regular classroom. Students also receive language level appropriate assignments and testing in their regular courses as well as advocacy by the ESL Level 3 teacher. Students in Level 3 generally do not take another English class. ESL Level 3 meets one period each day.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

224A/224B ESL Level 4

9-12

Lancaster

Level 4 is designed to assist students with a smooth transition to all regular classes, especially English classes, without modifications. Students focus on vocabulary development, academic writing skills, literature reading and interpretation, and test-taking skills (especially the TOEFL iBT). ESL Level 4 students may, with teacher recommendation, take an additional English course. Students taking ESL 4 are required to take the TOEFL iBT, TOEFL JR., ITEP SLATE, or IELTS as a part of each semester's coursework and grade. A TOEFL/iBT score of 75 or equivalent is needed to successfully complete the program. In addition, students are required to participate in an extra-curricular activity.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

The Family and Consumer Sciences curriculum is designed to increase students' knowledge and skills in the area of human development, family relationships, consumerism, foods and nutrition, clothing and textiles, and housing and interior decorating. Our goal is to manage with reason and creativity the challenges across the life span of living and working in a global society. Emphasis is placed on the responsible and biblical use of resources which incorporate Christian values to enhance the quality of family life.

659 Nutritional Science

10-12

Lancaster

Nutritional Science, also known as Food Science, is the study of the production, processing, preparation, evaluation and utilization of food. It is based on many other areas of science such as chemistry, biology, physics, and psychology (none of these areas are prerequisites to take the course.) Nutritional Science includes food labs to reinforce the study of the basic nutrients, leavening agents, fermentation, food safety and sanitation. This includes the use of scientific methods in laboratory experiments and food labs. Counts as 0.5 credit of science. (Lab Fee $45)

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st semester

660 Chinese Culinary Arts

10-12

Lancaster

This is an introductory course that focuses on Chinese foods, basic theories and methods of cooking, terminology, kitchen practices and lifestyle, history of Chinese cooking, food ingredients and their functions. Lab work and video presentations will cover Chinese cuisine and popular Chinese holiday dishes. The course will compare Western foods and preparation to Chinese foods and preparation. Additional cultural topics include hospitality, human longevity, impact on environment and medical systems. (Lab Fee $45)

Credits -

.5

Duration -

2nd semester

664 Child Development

11-12

Lancaster

This course is for students considering a child care/education career or becoming a mother/father someday. Physical, mental, emotional and social development of a child from conception to age 6 is studied. Special topics covered include pregnancy, birth, discipline, play, brain, child abuse and children with special needs. Story time once a week for 12 weeks is planned and implemented by the classes and is open to community participation.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

2nd semester

665 Food and Nutrition I

9-12

Lancaster

This course is an introduction to food preparation, cooking techniques, equipment and fundamental nutrition concepts and food appreciation. A variety of learning experiences include projects, experiments, and cooking labs are used to reinforce concepts. Nutrition as it relates to present eating habits and health concerns are studied. Meal preparation, presentation and styles of service are exemplified in Christmas and Spring Teas, apple pie contests. (Lab Fee $45)

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

666 Foods and Nutrition II

9-12

Lancaster

Units of study include yeast breads, international foods, meal planning, fast foods, gourmet cooking and nutrition issues among others. Group research projects and labs expose students to advanced food preparation techniques, food consumerism and world food issues. (Lab Fee $45)

Credits -

.5

Prerequisites -

Foods and Nutrition I, except for seniors who have instructor's approval.

Duration -

2nd semester

667 Fashion and Design I

10-12

Lancaster

An introduction to the study of apparel design, merchandising and consumerism, this course will emphasize basic elements of clothing design and construction with insights into career possibilities in this field. Students will study history of fashion, textile fundamentals and equipment usage, culminating with the construction of at least three original garments. Students will purchase fabric and supplies for garments.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st semester

668 Housing and Interior Decorating

10-12

Lancaster

This course helps students design a future "home." Included are housing designs and cultural influences on them, current and historic house styles, floor plans and furniture selection with an emphasis on current trends in home decorating. Career possibilities are explored. The use of the principles and elements of design in housing and interior decorating are utilized in the final presentation sample board.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

2nd semester, alternate years. Offered 2017-2018.

669 Creative Crafts

9-12

Lancaster

This course encourages students to combine creativity with basic skills and techniques of sewing, basket weaving, stenciling, cake decorating, quilting, candle making, etc.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st semester, alternate years. Offered 2018-2019.

670 Fashion and Design II

10-12

Lancaster

This course provides students with the opportunity to learn modern techniques of clothing constructions, the basic elements and principles of design as applied in dress and consumer information on fabric and fabric care. Students will purchase fabric and supplies for garments.

Credits -

.5

Prerequisites -

Fashion and Design I

Duration -

1st semester

Maintaining physical health and development is essential for a Christian. Our bodies are the "temples of God" and therefore must be respected and cared for properly. Physical activities not only maintain healthy bodies but also provide an outlet for normal energies and stress. It is hoped that exercise combined with the
classroom study of the physical and psychological person will instill in students a meaningful understanding of themselves.

701/702 Health/Safety Education—Driver Education

Required Course

10

Lancaster

Specific units in health include fitness, wellness and first aid. The driver education component includes the thirty hours of classroom instruction required of a state approved driver-training program. Students desiring behind-the-wheel instruction need to arrange separately for it (see "Driver Education"). Students in grades 11 or 12 who wish to take only the driver education course should make special arrangements with their guidance counselor. Required for 10th grade.

Credits -

.25 credit each for Health and Driver Education, .5 credit total

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

703 Health—9

Required Course

9

Lancaster

Classroom units include injury prevention and safety, individual growth and development, substance abuse, personal health, nutrition and exercise. Required for all 9th graders.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

704 Physical Education—9

Required Course

9

Lancaster

This course introduces students to a variety of team and lifetime sports activities. The following individual and team sports will be offered: fitness and weight training, football, softball, soccer, basketball, and volleyball. Required for all 9th grade students.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

783 Physical Education—10

Required Course

10

Lancaster

This course encourages students to develop a lifetime fitness plan that will meet their personal needs. The following individual and team sports will be offered: tennis, speedball, volleyball, weight training, team handball, badminton, and outdoor education. Required.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

787 Fall Team Sports

11-12

Lancaster

The major team sports in this unit include basketball, touch or flag football, soccer, softball, street hockey, and volleyball. Each student will be required to dress-out and participate in the activity selected for that day. This will be an exciting class for persons who enjoy playing team sports and want to get in shape at the same time. This class is not geared for the varsity athlete who wants to perfect his/her skills so they can compete at the varsity level.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st semester

788 Spring Team Sports

11-12

Lancaster

The major team sports in this unit include indoor/outdoor soccer, basketball, volleyball, street hockey, and styx ball (lacrosse). Each student will be required to dress-out and participate in the activity selected for that day. This will be an exciting class for persons who enjoy playing team sports and want to get in shape at the same time. This class is not geared for the varsity athlete who wants to perfect his/her skills in order to compete at the varsity level.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

2nd semester

789 Weight Training and Conditioning

11-12

Lancaster

The emphasis on this class will be on physical fitness (cardiovascular endurance) and weight training. Each student will participate in a circuit-type weight training program geared for his/her own personal needs and abilities. The purpose of this class will be to develop and maintain a high level of cardiovascular endurance and good muscle tone throughout the body. Each student will be evaluated on his/her own merit and they will not be compared to other students in the class. A great class for persons who like the challenge of setting personal goals and are willing to work hard to reach those goals.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

790 Weight Training and Conditioning II

11-12

Lancaster

For students who wish to continue their program beyond the first course.

Credits -

.5

Prerequisites -

Weight Training and Conditioning I

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

791 Weight Training and Conditioning III

11-12

Lancaster

For students who wish to continue their program beyond the second course.

Credits -

.5

Prerequisites -

Weight Training and Conditioning II

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

793 Racquet Sports

11-12

Lancaster

The sports involved in this introductory class will be tennis, badminton, floor tennis and ping pong. This will be an exciting class for persons who enjoy racquet sports and want to improve their eye-hand coordination and want to improve conditioning. This class is not geared for the varsity athlete who wants to perfect his/her skills so they can compete at the varsity level.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

Fall Team Sports

11-12

Hershey

The major team sports in this unit include basketball, touch or flag football, soccer, softball, street hockey, and volleyball. Each student will be required to dress-out and participate in the activity selected for that day. This will be an exciting class for persons who enjoy playing team sports and want to get in shape at the same time. This class is not geared for the varsity athlete who wants to perfect his/her skills so they can compete at the varsity level.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st semester

Health 11

Required Course

11

Hershey

Classroom units include injury prevention and safety, individual growth and development, substance abuse, personal health, nutrition and exercise. Required for all 11th graders.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

1st semester

Physical Education 10

Required Course

10

Hershey

This course introduces students to a variety of team and lifetime sports activities. The following individual and team sports will be offered: fitness, football, softball, soccer, basketball and volleyball. Required for grade 10.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

2nd semester

Physical Education 9

Required Course

9

Hershey

This course introduces students to a variety of team and lifetime sports activities. The following individual and team sports will be offered: fitness, football, softball, soccer, basketball, and volleyball. Required for grade 9.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

2nd semester

The staff in the Learning Support program works with students in a holistic way that enables them to grow academically, spiritually, socially, and physically. LMS offers services to ensure that students who learn differently are given a chance to realize their full academic potential. Federal and state guidelines are useful to
program design; however, LMS is an independent school and forms a program that best serves our students without the restrictions and requirements of strictly following government mandates.

The Learning Support staff partners with parents and teachers to provide students who might otherwise find it difficult to participate in the general education curriculum with the resources to achieve academic success in the classroom. The Learning Support program may include students with learning difficulties or disabilities.

LMS seeks to ensure students are included and successful in their least restrictive placement classes to the fullest extent that they are able. The Learning Support staff work with teachers to facilitate accommodations and differentiation of instruction. Accommodations and support are provided through an Individualized Academic Plan (IAP) for students who demonstrate a need.

800 Guided Study

9-12

Lancaster

This course is designed for Academic Support students who have an Individualized Academic Plan (IAP) and are in Academic Support five periods a week. The course provides support for students in a small group setting and focuses on organization, academic checks, study skills, small group instruction, test support, technology support, and parental and teacher support. A pass/fail grade will be issued for this semester-long course.

Credits -

.25

Duration -

1st or 2nd semester

Foundations of English

9-12

Lancaster

See course 218A/218B under "English."

Credits -

.5

Duration -

Yearlong

Foundations of Math

9-12

Lancaster

See course 401/402 under "Mathematics."

Credits -

.5

Duration -

Yearlong

General Social Studies

9-12

Lancaster

Students develop social skills including organization and healthy peer relationships as they expand their global awareness. Students learn skills in the following areas: study skills, career exploration, interviewing and employment, money management, organization and time management, leisure time activities, community living and general independent living skills. This course counts as one semester of social studies.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

Yearlong

Mathematics holds a central place in academic traditions and is a factor in the advancement of civilization. Mathematics is used in science and technology and is a basic tool for logical reasoning and decision-making processes. Mathematics is a common language in the global community and as such transcends national boundaries and becomes a useful model for the Christian community. Through mathematics, we see the beauty of God's creation as expressed in nature's symmetry and designs. It affirms God's awesome power.

400 AP Computer Science Principles

10-12

Lancaster

With a unique focus on creative problem solving and real-world applications, the AP Computer Science Principles course gives students the opportunity to explore several important topics of computing including Web Development, Programming, Digital Information, The Internet and Data. Students will use their own ideas and creativity to create artifacts of personal value including a final collaborative project. This course will also develop an interest in computer science that will foster further endeavors in the field. This course counts for math or science credit.

Credits -

1.0

Prerequisites -

Algebra I

Duration -

Yearlong

401/102 Foundations of Math

9-12

Lancaster

This course includes a variety of mathematical areas used in daily life. Students will work collaboratively and independently as they develop problem solving and critical thinking skills. Beginning algebraic concepts will also be introduced. Relevant daily living projects and assignments are included.

Credits -

.5

Duration -

Yearlong

403 Computer Science Principles

10-12

Lancaster

With a unique focus on creative problem solving and real-world applications, the Computer Science Principles course gives students the opportunity to explore Web development and Programming. This course will run concurrently with the AP Computer Science Principles course. While covering some of the same material the pace and scope will vary. Students will use their own ideas and creativity to create artifacts of personal value including a final collaborative project. This course will also develop an interest in computer science that will foster further endeavors in the field. This course counts for math or science credit.

Credits -

.5

Prerequisites -

Algebra I

Duration -

Yearlong

*405/406 Algebra I

9-12

Lancaster

This course focuses on extensive use of linear and simple quadratic equations, graphing, functions and relationships, and integrates geometry and algebra. Scientific calculators are required. Students are exposed to graphing calculators.

Credits -

1.0

Duration -

Yearlong

*407/408 Algebra II

9-12

Lancaster

Builds upon concepts learned in Algebra I. New topics include trigonometry, quadratic relations, and logarithms. A graphics calculator* is required which costs approximately $80-$95. (*Recommended brands: TI-83+ or TI-84)

Credits -

1.0

Prerequisites -

At least a "C" in Algebra I; At least a "C" in Geometry

Duration -

Yearlong

*409/410 Geometry

9-12

Lancaster

This course investigates a range of subjects including Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometry, spatial relations, logic, proof, congruence, transformations, polygons, circles, and the dimensions of various figures. This course reviews Algebra 1 content on a regular basis.

Credits -

1.0

Prerequisites -

At least a "C" in Algebra I

Duration -

Yearlong

411/412 Geometry (Part 1)

9-12

Lancaster

This course covers the first half of Geometry and investigates a range of subjects, including Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometry, spatial relations, logic, proof, congruence, transformations, polygons, circles, and the dimensions of various figures. This course reviews Algebra 1 content on a regular basis.

Credits -

1.0

Prerequisites -

At least a "C" in Algebra I or Algebra I, Part 2

Duration -

Yearlong

414 Computer Science

9-12

Lancaster

The main emphasis of this course is on programming and is oriented toward solving mathematics problems. Students will create some small games as well. It is strongly recommended that students taking this course enjoy math and problem solving. Keyboarding skills are helpful. Not offered in 2017-18.

Credits -

.5

Prerequisites -

Algebra I

Duration -

2nd semester

*415/416 Pre-Calculus

10-12

Lancaster

An elective which follows Algebra I and II and Geometry. It prepares students for college work in mathematics. The structure of the number system is stressed. Topics include sequences and series, mathematical induction, vectors, and trigonometry. A graphics calculator is required.

Credits -

1.0

Prerequisites -

At least a "C" in Algebra II and Geometry

Duration -

Yearlong

*417/418 Advanced Placement Calculus

11-12

Lancaster

Covers differentiation and integration and some of their applications. Limits and analytic geometry also receive quite a bit of attention. Students taking this course may take the Advanced Placement exam and should be able to test out of at least one semester of college calculus. A graphics calculator is required. This is a weighted class.

Credits -

1.0

Prerequisites -

At least a "C" in Advanced Math

Duration -

Yearlong

419/420 Algebra I (Part 1)

9-12

Lancaster

This course integrates algebra and geometry concepts at a slower pace. The course focuses on linear concepts and basic geometry. This course prepares students for Algebra I (Part 2). Students should have a scientific calculator.

Credits -

1.0

Duration -

Yearlong

421 Statistics

11-12

Lancaster

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data by exploring data, planning a study, producing models and confirming models by statistical inference. This academic class prepares students for either college or the world of work. A T1-83+ or T1-84 graphing calculator is required.

Credits -

.5

Prerequisites -

At least a "C" in Algebra II and completion of ESL 4

Duration -

1st semester

*423/424 Advanced Placement Statistics

11-12

Lancaster

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data, planning a study, and producing models using probability and simulation, and statistical inference. Students completing this class will be prepared for the Advanced Placement Statistics Exam. A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required. This is a weighted class.

Credits -

1.0

Prerequisites -

At least a "C" in Advanced Math and completion of ESL 4

Duration -

Yearlong

434/435 Algebra I (Part 2)

9-12

Lancaster

This course is a sequel to Algebra I (Part 1) and integrates algebra and geometry concepts. This course covers linear and quadratic equations, graphing, and functions in addition to basic geometry. Students who complete both parts of Algebra Parts 1 & 2 will have completed a full Algebra I course with basic geometry. Students should have a scientific calculator. They will be exposed to graphing calculators. This course prepares students for Geometry.

Credits -

1.0

Prerequisites -

Must have at least a "C" grade in Algebra I (Part 1)

Duration -

Yearlong

436/437 Geometry (Part 2)

9-12

Lancaster

This course is a sequel to Geometry, Part 1 and continues to investigate a range of subjects, including Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometry, spatial relations, logic, proof, congruence, transformations, polygons, circles, and the dimensions of various figures. This course reviews Algebra 1 content on a regular basis.

Credits -

1.0

Prerequisites -

At least a "C" in Geometry, Part 1

Duration -

Yearlong

Algebra I

9

Hershey

This course focuses on extensive use of linear and simple quadratic equations, graphing, functions and relationships, and integrates geometry and algebra. Scientific calculators are required. Students are exposed to graphing calculators.

Credits -

1.0

Duration -

Full year